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Welcome Back to Workbasket Wednesday

This post is the mega collection of all things work basket related. If you use structured work systems or independent work systems in your classroom (from TEACCH), this link up of posts will provide you with endless ideas for new tasks.
This post is the mega collection of all things work basket related. If you use structured work systems or independent work systems in your classroom (from TEACCH), this link up of posts will provide you with endless ideas for new tasks.

Many of you may have remembered Workbasket Wednesday.  It’s a linkup of blog posts about different tasks for structured work systems.  I know we can always looking for tasks that our students can complete on their own so we can focus on teaching them to work independently.

I want to bring it back and make this page a perpetual linkup of blog posts with ideas for independent work tasks.  In addition, I will be launching a full, in depth review of independent work systems. I’ll include how and why we use them and how to set them up for success in your classroom.

What Are Independent Work Systems?

Independent work systems were started by TEACCH at UNC-Chapel Hill as part of Structured Teaching.  They answer 4 basic questions: What work do I need to do? How much work do I need to do? How do I know when I am finished? What do I do next?

The goal of independent or structured work systems is to teach students how to complete a set of tasks independently.  Given how our students are often highly supported by staff, learning to work on their own is a critical skill.  The elements of a work system are critical to teaching the needed skill and to moving the student forward to more independence.  Work systems can take students from practicing mastered tasks in the classroom to doing a series of tasks at work.  Over the next few weeks I’ll share some more information about work tasks in a series of blog posts.

Structured work systems were identified as an evidence-based practice in 2011 and an emerging practice in 2014 (read more about that here). Over the next few weeks I’ll share some more information about work tasks in a series of blog posts.

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What Makes a Good Work Task?

Wondering what makes a good work task?  It is more than just fitting a task into a box.  You can find out more at this post.  Below are links to my past Workbasket Wednesday posts with the link ups.  And below are links from other bloggers with ideas for all different ages.

More Workbasket Resources

Looking for more ideas on work systems and how they can be used?  Check out the links in Resources below for more posts.  And, I wrote about a book about them!  Click on the book to the left for an Amazon Affiliate link (see my disclosure policy for more information about affiliate links).

GET ALL THE VISUALS AND ORGANIZATIONAL TOOLS YOU NEED to start independent work in your classroom.

These kits include an e-book with directions on setting up independent work systems and using the materials included, data sheets for tracking progress, visuals for the bins and schedules, what’s next visuals, and mastery sheets to keep track of which students have mastered which task. 

GET ALL THE VISUALS AND ORGANIZATIONAL TOOLS YOU NEED to start independent work in your classroom.

These kits include an e-book with directions on setting up independent work systems and using the materials included, data sheets for tracking progress, visuals for the bins and schedules, what’s next visuals, and mastery sheets to keep track of which students have mastered which task. 

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